Forget satisfaction, what’s your net promoter score?

13 05 2011

What’s your team’s/club’s/sport’s Net Promoter Score? Or put another way, how many of your current customers would actively refer you to their friends?

While debate rages about how accurately this measure can predict revenue growth, most leading companies still pay more attention to this measure than they do to customer satisfaction scores. Why? Because we’ve all claimed to be satisfied when a waiter asks for our feedback on an ordinary meal. But rarely have we then recommended that restaurant to our friends.

Net Promoter Score was in the London news this week, in an article about Metro Bank. If you’ve not heard of them, they’ve just opened their sixth branch in London and are owned by Vernon Hill. According to the article, Metro Bank have a Net Promoter Score of 97% – that means 97% of their existing customers would recommend them to a friend.

Now they’re still very young, but that’s still a remarkable number. For context, the reported score for First Direct (who have a strong history of growth through word of mouth) was 57%, for RBS was 10% and for Barclays was -35%. In Barclays’ case, that means 35% of its clients would actively dissuade a friend from using it.

From a sports perspective, it’s easy to think that all our regular participants would recommend us to their friends. After all, they must love the club/sport if they keep doing it. But if that were the case, every team and leisure centre would be experiencing astronomic growth!

So what would you need to do, to have 97% of your current customers wanting to recommend your team or sport to a friend..?





Voice of the customer – Cadbury’s divide chocolate lovers

17 07 2009

There are many elements to delivering a great customer experience. And Cadbury seem to have tripped over one at the same time as they’ve succeeded with another.

Cadbury’s recent TV ads have won them many accolades, tweets, posts and comments. The gorrilla feeling the air has nearly 4 million YouTube views, and the eyebrows already have more. I’m sure the word of mouth from these ads has even driven a few extra sales for Cadbury and Phil Collins.

But all is not smooth and milky in Bourville. Cadbury have apparently downsized their Dairy Milk bar to 200g, and customers have rebelled like angry gorrillas. And in the same way that customers can spread the good news about a fun advert, they also have powerful ways of sharing their displeasure. A chocloate lovers action group has sprung up, with a website and twitter account. There’s also a YouTube video, comparing the packaging and showing the reaction of some consumers.

In years gone by, such rumblings may have soon disappeared. But the mainstream media has picked up on it now too, with a story on Campbell Live and a story in the National Business Review by Hazel Phillips. This in turn has inspired one of Cadbury’s local competitors, Whittaker’s, to get on the front foot and create a comparative advert.

Cadbury’s say that they prefer to focus on the ‘fun & enjoyment’ of chocolate, but it goes to show that customer engagement comes from delivering a consistent customer experience across all customer touchpoints.








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